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Woman at the well reflection

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Imagine yourself as the woman in this passage. Jesus approaches you and tries to reveal his thirst to you—perhaps his thirst for intimacy with you—but you put him off. You are not worthy. When he offers to satisfy your thirst, you put him off. Ask: How do I put Jesus off, with excuses, problems, or barriers? When Jesus shows the woman that he knows her, she comes to understand she is in the presence of someone special—perhaps the One she has thirsted for all her life.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: H. B. Charles - The Woman at the Well

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Lessons from the woman at the well

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Throughout the gospels in the New Testament, there are many stories about encounters between Jesus and seemingly random people. I often study these scriptures and sometimes, commentaries in an attempt to extract meaning from these brief exchanges. One of the encounters is between Jesus and a Samaritan woman, who is often referred to as the woman at the well.

The disciples seem to have disappeared for a while and so Jesus goes to the well by himself to get a drink of water. There he encounters a woman with whom he has an unusual conversation. She seems to know a lot about spiritual practices and beliefs, including the promise of a Messiah. As they talk, Jesus reveals himself as the Messiah and offers water that satisfies all thirstiness. In the story of Jesus and the woman at the well, we see how conversation sparks transformation. The woman has a face-to-face, one-to-one interaction with Jesus while she collects water at the well.

This meeting is not a chance encounter and is unusual for a variety of reasons. Typically, people come to the well early in the morning. But this woman arrives in the heat of the day. She may want to avoid other women as she may be shunned because of her promiscuity she has had many husbands and the man she lives with now is not her husband. The interaction between Jesus and the woman is unconventional.

And, a private conversation between this holy man and promiscuous woman could be considered scandalous. True transformation involves an encounter with God. We may not expect this interaction but it happens in the course of our daily routines. The woman was upfront with Jesus about her beliefs and her doubts. She questions him and his motives. How can you ask me for a drink?

Her directness and honesty are a great example of how we can be straightforward with Jesus, as long as we are open to hearing the truth. Based on this story and my own experiences, I believe Jesus prefers honest questioning over human holiness or false respect. He welcomes the opportunity to speak with us, even in unconventional conversations.

The woman at the well articulates and defends her worldview to Jesus. She starts by questioning his actions in the context of the initial interaction, asking why a Jewish man should interact with a Samaritan woman.

Then she moves to broader issues, challenging whether he is greater than her ancestor Jacob who gave her people the well and whether the proper place of worship is on the mountain or Jerusalem. What is most notable about this encounter is that the woman changes her view of the world based on her conversation with Jesus.

She exchanges past suppositions for new truths. Changing the lens through which you view the world is perhaps the hardest thing that we can do. For me, abandoning a long-term belief is difficult and upsetting. But being able to toss out wrong ideas and replace them with more accurate views of reality is a turning point, sparking transformation. We are told what the woman said in her conversation with Jesus.

Both truth and grace are vital to transformation. The woman had most likely experienced plenty of truth about herself and her transgressions; as a result, she wanted to avoid others.

But here, she also experiences grace, acceptance and forgiveness, which compels her to share her story freely. The transformation is evident when the woman tells her story to the people in her town. Her words must have been convincing because she now has credibility in her community. Being able to triumphantly emerge from a difficult situation and articulate how change occurred is both a sign of transformation and a transforming experience itself.

I think this woman is ready for a new, different life. Interestingly, she seems to have above average knowledge about spiritual practices and beliefs of the day. Like her, we may think that our mistakes have doomed us. Here we see how an uncomfortable situation helps redeem this woman and transform her relationship with God and other people. By sharing her story, she likely sparks a change among those in her community.

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The woman at the well is transformed by her encounter with Jesus. Her experiences, from past to present, help us understand change. Lessons: Honesty and willingness to see a different reality leads to dramatic change In the story of Jesus and the woman at the well, we see how conversation sparks transformation.

Be upfront with God The woman was upfront with Jesus about her beliefs and her doubts. Be willing to change our worldview The woman at the well articulates and defends her worldview to Jesus. Recognize truth and accept grace We are told what the woman said in her conversation with Jesus. Share your story The transformation is evident when the woman tells her story to the people in her town.

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The Woman at the Well: How Transformation Happens

Posted on March 13, Updated on March 13, Full scripture for this Sunday is available on the Catholic Ireland website. Daily Scripture is also available. Jesus came to the Samaritan town called Sychar, near the land that Jacob gave to his son Joseph. His disciples had gone into the town to buy food.

In an article first published in The Irish Catholic, Brendan Comerford finds lenten inspiration in the Gospel story of the Samaritan woman at the well outside Sychar. I can never resist the temptation to do so since the Gospel reading for The Third Sunday of Lent, Year A, is the marvellous story of Jesus meeting the Samaritan woman at the well John If someone were to ask you what is your image of Jesus, what would you say?

This Sunday, the Third Sunday of Lent, we will hear in the Gospel the story of the encounter and conversation of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well. I invite you to think about the thirst of Jesus and the thirst of the woman in the Gospel, representing also our thirst, the thirst of our souls. On the surface, Jesus was naturally thirsty. Jesus asks the woman for a drink of water.

In Truth and Charity: The woman at the well

Throughout the gospels in the New Testament, there are many stories about encounters between Jesus and seemingly random people. I often study these scriptures and sometimes, commentaries in an attempt to extract meaning from these brief exchanges. One of the encounters is between Jesus and a Samaritan woman, who is often referred to as the woman at the well. The disciples seem to have disappeared for a while and so Jesus goes to the well by himself to get a drink of water. There he encounters a woman with whom he has an unusual conversation. She seems to know a lot about spiritual practices and beliefs, including the promise of a Messiah. As they talk, Jesus reveals himself as the Messiah and offers water that satisfies all thirstiness. In the story of Jesus and the woman at the well, we see how conversation sparks transformation. The woman has a face-to-face, one-to-one interaction with Jesus while she collects water at the well.

The Samaritan Woman

Augustine here reflects on the famous conversation in the Gospel of John between Jesus and the Samaritan woman who came to draw water from the well. He sees her as a symbol for the Gentiles who are called to conversion and faith and who are promised the gift of the Holy Spirit in abundance. A woman came. She is a symbol of the Church not yet made righteous.

What makes this world so lovely is that somewhere it hides a well. I think it comes at a perfect time as after a few weeks of our Lenten journey, we are certainly in need of a well!

This Samaritan woman goes to the well in the heat of the day most likely because she wanted to avoid running into others who would look on her as a tainted woman. She is surprised to encounter a man, and even more a Jewish man, who initiates a conversation with her. She was already vulnerable because of her past and when she meets this man, Jesus, she could immediately recognize his acceptance. So she is comfortable enough to offer him a drink of water.

Jesus Talks to the Woman at the Well | Minute Gospel Reflections for Kids

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Chosen Jesus and the Samaritan Woman At The Well

The Samaritan woman at the well is a figure from the Gospel of John , in John — The woman appears in John 4 :4—42, However below is John — But he had to go through Samaria. So he came to a Samaritan city called Sychar , near the plot of ground that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob's well was there, and Jesus, tired out by his journey, was sitting by the well. It was about noon.

Samaritan woman at the well

During the six weeks of Lent , Bishop Donal McKeown invites us, as individuals, as families and parish faith communities of the Diocese of Derry, to use the six Sunday Gospels of Lent to look at the life of service to which God is calling all of us, as the disciples of Jesus. Priests and parishioners of the diocese are asked to create opportunities in their parish for discussion of each Gospel reflection. The parish conversation may take place over a cup of tea after Mass, it might take place after a Weekday Mass, it might be in the form of a more structured discussion perhaps put together by the Parish Pastoral Council. It could be a case of handing out flyers at Mass with the discussion points, so that families can discuss them at home. Bishop Donal's third reflection for consideration is outlined below.

Mar 10, - A reflection by Bishop Donal McKeown, Bishop of Derry of the Gospel of the third Sunday of Lent 'The Samaritan Woman at the Well'.

From a talk given at St. Jesus came to a town of Samaria called Sychar, near the plot of land that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jesus, tired from his journey, sat down there at the well.

Gospel Reflection

The story of the woman at the well is one of the most well known in the Bible; many Christians can easily tell a summary of it. On its surface, the story chronicles ethnic prejudice and a woman shunned by her community. But take look deeper, and you'll realize it reveals a great deal about Jesus' character. Above all, the story, which unfolds in John , suggests that Jesus is a loving and accepting God, and we should follow his example.

Faith reflections: Women at the well

Barely two months after graduating from college, I boarded a plane and landed in The Gambia, West Africa, to begin my service as a Peace Corps volunteer. I found myself in a new land, with a new language, new customs and new food. I saw her in the village, women who worked day in and day out feeding and caring for their children and families; cleaning, cooking and working the fields.

This reflection on John considers how Jesus values the people scorned by others, in this instance a Samaritan Woman.

Jump to navigation. If we go to school to the Samaritan woman at the well, what lessons can we learn for women in the church today? There are at least three dimensions to the instruction to be received from this unnamed woman, having to do with daring to question, with openness to truth and with taking responsibility. First, this woman is faced with a request from a stranger.

Woman at the Well: A Story of a Loving God

Question: "What can we learn from the woman at the well? This was an extraordinary woman. She was a Samaritan , a race of people that the Jews utterly despised as having no claim on their God, and she was an outcast and looked down upon by her own people. However, this woman was ostracized and marked as immoral, an unmarried woman living openly with the sixth in a series of men. The story of the woman at the well teaches us that God loves us in spite of our bankrupt lives. God values us enough to actively seek us, to welcome us to intimacy, and to rejoice in our worship. To be wanted, to be cared for when no one, not even herself, could see anything of value in her—this is grace indeed.

Third Sunday of Lent: The Woman at the Well

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Comments: 1
  1. Kajijind

    Ideal variant

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