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What do you look for in a job interview question

When an employer asks you what you look for in a job, they are not necessarily looking for a particular answer. They are simply looking to see what your priorities are and if you can put them into words. Any number of things can be put together to create a great answer to this question including company culture, performance based rewards, teamwork, growth potential etc. Secondly, I look for companies who have a positive and adaptive culture. A positive workplace will create high levels of respect and trust amongst its employees.

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Difficult interview questions and the answers to get you hired

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How many times heavier than a mouse is an elephant? How many square feet of pizza are consumed in the United States each year? Hiring managers have heard about using these "curveball" questions to identify the best candidates. Fortunately, for intelligent and qualified candidates everywhere, studies have found that the brainteaser interview questions made famous by Silicon Valley and Wall Street are just as silly as they sound.

In fact, Google started to phase out brainteasers from its interviews several years ago. But when you're interviewing people to join your team, you have to get creative. After all, there's only so much that questions like "What's your biggest weakness? To help give you some ideas for the next time you're meeting with a job candidate, here are some of the best job interview questions to ask, and good answers to each question. If you're looking for a candidate who is goal-oriented and results-driven -- as most hiring managers are -- this question will help you gauge whether they'll be able to handle the audacious goals you have in store for them.

Ask follow-up questions like, "what did you do to achieve them? A good answer to this interview question shows they understand what difficult goals are, and that they put a lot of effort into attaining their goals while maintaining a high standard of work quality.

Listen for answers that describe a lofty goal and show why this goal challenged their normal targets. Responses that admit the candidate came up short of this goal can also indicate self-awareness and confidence despite a lack of success. This is a unique and more challenging approach to the generic "What does our company do?

It forces candidates to not only drum up the research they've done to prepare for the interview, but also show they can use this research to craft a persuasive message that would be valuable in a business situation. This will come more naturally to some candidates than others. Above all, good answers to this interview question are able to combine an accurate definition of your company with what it offers to your core customer that they need or can't get anywhere else.

Keep in mind that someone interviewing for a sales or marketing position might find it easier than someone interviewing for a non-client facing role -- and that's okay. You aren't necessarily assessing their delivery. But it'll be interesting to see how each candidate thinks through and gives their response.

Each team is different, so this question helps you tease out whether the candidate would be happy, productive, and well liked on your team. Their answer will tell you how they interact with others -- and which kinds of interactions they want to happen. Answers to this question don't have to focus on just professional elements of a relationship with colleagues -- they can also be related to business culture.

Maybe the candidate enjoyed their coworker's positivity or thought their attitude lowered morale. Good responses aren't one-sided, though. Look for answers that explain how their colleague's work style thrived or conflicted with their own -- not simply what their colleague did that benefited or offended them. Many candidates are hesitant to bad-mouth their coworkers and bosses, so it'll be interesting for you to hear how they navigate a question about their worst working relationships.

Candidates' answers will tell you about their prior success and sense of ownership. A great answer will show they are confident in their work and professional choices while being humble enough to show they care about the company's success. For example, if a candidate built a sales or marketing campaign they're particularly proud of, listen for them to explain how the business benefited from it. Did it help the company sign a major client? A candidate's answer to this question will give you an idea of how they viewed work they weren't very happy with, which is bound to happen to everyone in every job at one point or another.

Even the category of what they consider an experience they wouldn't want to repeat is interesting, says Redbord. When you talk about extreme experiences that get people emotional, it can be very revealing. Keep in mind, however, that good answers don't have to fall into any one category -- what's most important is if they extracted value from the experience despite their lack of interest in doing it again.

If your candidate responds with "It depends," hear them out -- the interview question itself is phrased in such a way that candidates can sense there is a right and wrong answer, and they'll be looking for signs from you that they're heading in the right direction. For most companies, the correct answer is "good and on time. Let's face it, every blog post, email, book, video, etc. At some point, you've just got to ship it. Most managers don't want someone who can't hit deadlines because they're paralyzed by perfection.

Try to remain neutral as they feel out their response, though. They might not be able to relate to work that's measured purely by quality and deadline, but it's important that they can express how they prioritize their tasks. This is a much better test of intelligence than a college GPA, and it's also a great gauge of a candidate's passion and charisma outside of their core job responsibilities.

Candidates who are passionate and knowledgeable about something -- and can convey that well -- are more likely to be enthusiastic and influential at work. The "something" in this question doesn't have to be work-related -- it can be a hobby, a sports team, something technical Good responses will tell you how well your candidate comprehends complex subjects and that they can articulate that subject to someone who doesn't know much about it.

Explanations that use analogies also make good answers, especially if it's a topic that is filled with industry jargon. This shows that the candidate can solve problems by drawing comparisons to things that are more universally understood. Some organizations move at very different paces, and this question is an effective way to tell whether your candidate will be able to keep pace with the rest of the team.

It also helps you identify someone who is a "hard worker in disguise," meaning someone who might currently be at a slow-moving organization or in a role that is not well-suited to them, but wants to work somewhere where they can really get their hands dirty. A good answer doesn't have to produce evidence of hard work -- it should rather reveal if your candidate knows what it takes to get something done and solve the problems it was designed to solve. Answers that talk about working hard by working smart are great, as well.

Always listen for this -- putting in the work to find the best way of doing something is often just as important as the task itself. At work, you can't please everyone all the time. The answer to this question will help you find out if your candidate has enough drive and conviction in their own work to have ever conflicted with one or more of their colleagues.

Obviously you don't want the candidate to be an unlikable person, though, so consider asking follow-up questions to find out why they might have alienated these coworkers: "If I were to interview these people, what words would they most frequently use to describe you? The follow-up question about word choice is more important than the percentage they give in the initial question. In their answers, you should be encouraged by words like "passionate" and concerned by words like "lazy.

Of course, not all negative words are red flags -- while words that indicate a lack of work ethic might be a bad sign, words like "stubborn" could show a candidate's self-awareness -- and commitment to things their coworkers would rather move on from. An oldie but goodie. This is a tried-and-true test for self-awareness. Honestly, well-prepared candidates should see it coming and have an answer ready.

Someone who takes ownership of their mess-up and learns something from it is usually humble and mindful. Candidates who blame others or give a "fake" screw-up something like "I worked too hard and burned out. These questions test what the candidate values and aspires to by forcing them to think of a real person they know, and then articulate what makes that person smart.

Ideal answers vary, but could include specific examples of the person they've chosen's ability to think ahead several steps and execute.

They could also touch on the person's decision-making skills, ability to connect, desire for learning, or application of the things they learned. While it's important to hire for skill, it's also important to hire someone who's likely to be happy in the job for which you're hiring. A question like this one will help uncover what makes each candidate happy at work -- which is a great way to gauge whether they'd enjoy their role and stay at the company for a long time.

There's no right answer to this question -- it's more of a learning opportunity for you to see what your employees most enjoy in the industry. Nonetheless, a candidate's answer to this question should align with the core responsibilities of the job for which they're applying. A sales candidate who says they could lead client kickoff meetings every day, for example, is a much better fit than a sales candidate who prefers to create lead-generating campaigns a task that shows a bigger interest in the marketing side of things.

First, the type of business they choose to talk about can reveal a lot about their interests, values, and how creative they are. Second, it'll give you insight into how business-savvy they are. The best answers to this question will get specific: They'll offer an overview of the business and get into the logistics of where that money would go, whom they'd hire first, and so on. Here's a great way to figure out how a candidate approaches decision-making.

Answering Tough Interview Questions

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The bottom line is that because many candidates skip over preparing for this question out of frustration, you can use this question and your answer to give you an advantage and an edge over the competition. The interviewer is looking for similar things whether asking about company or position. The hiring manager wants to:.

Are you wondering what an interviewer looks for during an interview, or what you should do to get him to like you? Is there some secret to figuring out if the interview is going well or something else you can do to insure that it does? Interviewers look for things they want to hear in your answers, or ways you handle yourself during the interview, or simply some sign that shows them what you might be like if you worked for them. So I thought it might help you to know what kinds of things I specifically look for, and what I want to hear when I interview job candidates:.

Coburg Banks

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How To Ace The 50 Most Common Interview Questions

If what you say you're looking for doesn't match the job you're interviewing for, you'll probably be out of contention. Your answer will be as individual as you are. The interviewer wants to know whether your goals are a match for the company. Are you looking for an opportunity to grow with an organization—or will your plans take you to another employer before long?

This is not a trick question. But you would be surprised how many candidates find it hard to respond professionally.

Time is of the essence; employers want to hire someone yesterday. The typical interview questions they ask are designed to cut to the chase and give you the best chance to sell yourself to them. Knowing how to respond can give you the edge you need to nab a job offer.

20 Things an Interviewer Looks For During a Job Interview

If you have interviews coming up, this article is for you. This is one of the most common questions to practice for. I read the list of clients on your website.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: "WHY DO YOU WANT TO WORK FOR US?" Best Answer Interview Question!

If this is your first time registering, please check your inbox for more information about the benefits of your Forbes account and what you can do next! The moral of the story was that job seekers need to anticipate less conventional interview questions, and that they should think of oddball queries as an opportunity to demonstrate their thought process, to communicate their values and character, and to show the prospective employer how they perform under pressure. Land a great job, handle your boss and get ahead today. Do your homework. Shweta Khare, a career and job search expert says getting a list of common questions for an interview is easier than ever before. It's the first step and the most important," she says.

100 top job interview questions—be prepared

Thinking up questions to ask during job interviews is key. Remember, every interview is a two-way street. You should be interviewing the employer just as much as they're interviewing you. You both need to walk away convinced that the job would be a great fit. So when the tables are turned and the interviewer asks, "Do you have any questions for me? It's the best way to determine if you'd be happy working for this employer, and whether your goals are aligned with theirs. Plus, asking questions is a simple way to convey your enthusiasm for the role and the organization that you're looking to join.

Jan 26, - When an employer asks you what you look for in a job, they are not necessarily Do you need help with your job interview preparation?

Hopefully, this article will give you a peace of mind on what not to say and how to get the interviewer on your side. Click To Tweet. This can include future ambitions or what makes you tick as an individual. The latter could be anything from money and job satisfaction to the feeling of being wanted or the platform to progress through the company.

HOW TO ANSWER: Why Do You Want to Work Here?

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12 Factors to Look For in a Job Other than a Paycheck

Consider this as your opportunity to position yourself and gain a competitive advantage over other candidates. Walk in well-prepared to give a solid answer. A good answer requires some forethought and preparation that will make it easier to answer this question for other opportunities, too.

While there are as many different possible interview questions as there are interviewers, it always helps to be ready for anything. Which is why we've taken the time to prepare this list of potential interview questions.

They will be listening for any red flags that may come up. For example, how do you handle conflict resolution? In particular, they may become concerned if you say negative things about your former employer, wondering if you would, in turn, also say negative things about them one day. This is a good answer for several reasons.

Do you generally speak to people before they speak to you? It depends on the circumstances. What was the last book you read? Movie you saw? Sporting event you attended? Talk about books, sports or films to show that you have balance in your life. What is the toughest part of a job for you?

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